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Archive for September, 2011

Fuel Theatre

Fuel Theatre have commissioned a series of podcasts created especially for you to enjoy at a particular time and place.

Imagine there was a soundtrack to those small moments when you find yourself alone, brushing your teeth, in the bath, watching the rain stream down your living room window, or when you’re tucked up in bed unable to sleep.

Artists making the podcasts with us include: Inua Ellams, Nic Green, John Hegley, Kazuko HohkiAdrian Howells, Josie Long, Peggy Shaw, Hofesh Shechter, Lemn Sissay, and Nick Whitfield.
One podcast a month will be released throughout 2011. 

Listen here

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Craft Trail Feedback

FIRST I HAVE TO SAY IT WAS GREAT TO GET AN INSIGHT TO LEITH DOCKS, IT BROUGHT MEMORIES BACK FOR ME.  THE TOUR FOR ME, WAS  VERY INTERESTING AND WELL DESCRIBED, ESPECIALLY THE ARCHITECTURAL STUFF ON THE WALLS, WHICH WE PROBABLY WOULD NOT NOTICE IF IT HAD NOT BEN POINTED OUT TO US. 
FRANCIS REALLY INSPIRED ME WITH HER TALK, HER FEELINGS AND HER MOTIVATION. 
IT MADE A VERY GOOD CONTRAST TO THE MUSEUM TOUR.  I WAS ALSO IMPRESSED WITH THE WORK SHE IS DOING IN HER WORKSHOP, IT WAS GREAT TO SEE THINGS FROM BEGINNING TO END, INSTEAD OF HALF WAY THROUGH. 
I WOULD LIKE TO THANK YOU FOR ALL THE HARD WORK YOU PUT INTO THESE THINGS FOR US, I DO APPRECIATE IT.

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Craft Trail

Edits from a tour of Leith led by artist Frances Priest:

developed in partnership with Craft Scotland

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architect led tour

Edits from a tour of the National Museum of Scotland led by architect and audio describer Amanda Drollinger:

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Berlin tours

Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp Memorial Museum

Here the location was most similar to the plans  for the Edinburgh tour.

Rather than being just one building like 1. and 2. , this was a site covering what had been a camp for well over 12,000 people with many separate buildings.

There was no way of checking out where you were E.g. via a GPS audio message which responds to the question “where am I?”. If this could be a feature in Edinburgh it would be very useful if the response then led the user to the number to press for  the  nearest audio information point.

This keypad  was the most recognisable one in its layout and it had a tiny tactile dot on the 5.  When you pressed a number, there was good time to

lift the lollipop to the ear to start listening.   A great strength of this audio description was that each topic offered additional information which went more deeply into the content or gave personal illustrative testimonies.

Might we consider using this device for additional poetry or prose?

General Points

None of these audio sets enabled a user to run through the list of contents easily in order then to select how much and which to listen to. Invariably there was far too much on offer and I doubt if anyone would work their way through it all. So even more important to be able to select from what is available/ particular interests etc.

I strongly recommend that the Edinburgh handset be selected so it can be used independently by a VI person. Fine if a screen giving info is also included for sighted people and others with a small amount of sight. High contrast white print on a black background would aid the latter.


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audio described architecture tour

From Vocaleyes website:

Once a place has been booked on an audio described tour of a building, you will be sent an introductory CD to listen to. This has been specially written and will include some basic information about the building, its history and what to expect during the tour itself.

The CD will also contain access information including how to get there, meeting points and any other relevant details. The information on the CD will also be available on the VocalEyes website where it can be read as a text document or downloaded as an MP3.

An audio described tour is a live interactive event and generally lasts about 90 minutes. In some cases there is a workshop prior to the tour, which can include the opportunity to explore a tactile scale model of the building. There are also examples of building materials that can be handled.

Both the workshop and the tour are led by a professional VocalEyes describer together with an architectural expert. There may also be input from a curator or someone with an intimate knowledge of the building. During the preparation period, the describer works closely with these experts, drawing on their professional knowledge.

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I enjoyed learning:

Her description of the new entrance hall and how every museum now had to have a cafe and gift shop!

How the Main Hall had been decorated to emply the iron work and to return it to the space for promenading, as it was designed for when it was first built.  (I thought it had been ceared for larger _ and receptions!)

Why the Hawthornden Court was wedge shaped, how the use of steel for construction enabled the construction of almost unsupported stairs and even walls.  And specifically about the 10cm gap in the low wall!

The unusual construction of the spiral staircase.  I had not  noticed how different it was.

How, on the Terrace special frames were made for views eg Arturs Seat.  And also that the plants in the roof garden were all native Scottish plants.  Also that modern buildings should have roof gardens!

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