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Archive for October, 2011

some sound artists

Here are some sound artists…….

Bruce Neuman http://www.tate.org.uk/modern/exhibitions/nauman/

Sarah Philipz http://theendofbeing.com/2010/12/06/lowlands-sound-sculptor-susan-philipsz-wins-the-turner-prize/

Paul Rooney (we have worked with him in the Royal Infirmary) http://www.axisweb.org/ofSARF.aspx?SELECTIONID=72

‘In writing the texts, I often work with people to engage with the particular roles they occupy in various ways, highlighting everyday practices, and peripheral positions, as potential sites for creativity and resistance to wider social structures. Recent works have involved collaborating with a TV audience warm up man, residents of a tower block, and a speech and language therapy patient. The work extends to engage with how we occupy or engage with specific physical places, in a more poetic or imaginative sense. Pop music, along with many forms of culture, often relies for its power on wider imaginative worlds that are associated with the artists or context, worlds which extend much further than the initial pop song or comedy routine, often blurring the line between truth and fiction.’

Voice-over sound tracks are key elements, referencing narrative forms such as songs, audio guides, sermons and other modes of storytelling, spoken from the position of a variety of roles or personas, such as a nightclub cloakroom attendant, a tourist guide or a fanzine writer. The works provide a contemplative space for the viewer to engage with the spoken or sung texts on the soundtracks.

Jim Finer http://www.scoreforaholeintheground.org/

Katie Paterson http://www.katiepaterson.org/vatnajokull/

Bill Fontana http://www.resoundings.org/

I have worked for the past 30 years creating installations that use sound as a sculptural medium to interact with and transform our perceptions of visual and architectural settings. These have been installed in public spaces and museums around the world including San Francisco, New York, Paris, London, Berlin, Venice, Sydney and Tokyo.

My sound sculptures use the human and/or natural environment as a living source of musical information. I am assuming that at any given moment there will be something meaningful to hear and that music, in the sense of coherent sound patterns, is a process that is going on constantly.

 

Artists/practitioners with specific experience of working with visually impaired people:

Kaffe Matthews http://www.kaffematthews.net/

Frerens Art Gallery http://www.museumsassociation.org/museum-practice/access-visually-impaired-visitors/15092011-creating-inclusive-museum-environments/15092011-ferens-art-gallery

Cormac Faulkner http://cormacfaulkner.wordpress.com/

Cormac Faulkner is an Irish sound artist now based in Coventry. His work is concerned with our reaction to different spaces and how our behavior and understanding can change when presented with new information and new ways of exploring them. He is a multi-disciplinary artist and use sound, video and photography in his work

Imperial College/Royal College of Art http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege/newssummary/news_19-7-2011-9-51-55

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Holyrood Palace

I liked the audio guide:

  1. Good instructions
  2. Good descriptions
  3. More detail (hsitory or description) optional
  4. Guide to many rooms inside and to grounds and Abby
  5. Instructions to ask wardens for more information (which I did)
  6. The words were friendly and helpful
  7. Many rooms on view
  8. Seats available in many rooms
  9. There was a warden in every room

Not so good:

  1. Finding the entrance and ticket office
  2. The “on” and “off” buttons of the audio guide were close together in the middle of the hand set.  I pressed the wrong button and had to ask a warden for help. (information at beginning not too clear!)
  3. The last flight of stairs before the exit were of dark stone and required care.

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I enjoyed:

  1. Hearing the names, dates and histories of the buildings
  2. Hearing the descriptions of the decorations on them
  3. Catching glimpses of old lanes and yards as we went past
  4. Speculating on the painted advertisements above the shops
  5. Appreciating the open space beside the river
  6. Sitting in the sun hearing about the old church
  7. Seeing inside the old converted warehouse at Fran’s studio

I have often been told to look up, but I now need a good description of what can be seen.  And historical facts add to my enjoyment.

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